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Britain’s FBI helps grab £100million cocaine haul on its way to London

Britain’s FBI helps grab £100million 1.6 ton cocaine haul on its way to London’s streets in biggest New York seizure of the drug in 25 years

  • Some 60 packages weighing almost 1.6 tons were seized in Newark last month
  • The cocaine was due to be shipped to Rotterdam and then sent on to London
  • The huge haul is equivalent to a third of all the cocaine seized in the UK last year
  • It is believed the drugs could have produced more than 15million lines of cocaine

Britain’s FBI has helped to seize a £100million haul of cocaine near New York which was due to be shipped to London. 

The National Crime Agency revealed the huge bounty today after British agents helped to pull off the New York area’s largest drug seizure for 25 years. 

Some 60 packages weighing about 1.6 tons (1,437kg) were intercepted during the bust on February 28, the NCA said. 

The container discovered in Newark was due to be shipped to Rotterdam in the Netherlands, and then onwards to an address in London. 

Bundles full of cocaine were concealed within this container and discovered at the port of New York in Newark. The drugs were believed to have a street value of at least £100million 

The UK street value of the cocaine was estimated to be in excess of £100 million ($131million). 

The weight of the drugs is equivalent to more than a third of all the cocaine seized in Britain last year. 

In 2017/18 there were more than 15,000 cocaine seizures in the UK, taking 7,405lbs (3,359kg) of the drug off the streets. 


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It is believed the illicit drugs could have produced more than 15million lines of cocaine.  

The container was recovered from a ship that originated in South America, U.S. customs officials said. 

The U.S. Coast Guard, customs and border agency, drugs enforcement officials and New York City’s police department were all involved in the raid.      

The container was recovered from a ship that originated in South America, according to U.S. customs officials. The container in which the cocaine was found is shown at left

The raid marks the biggest cocaine seizure at the ports since 1994. The drugs, which have been turned over to federal Homeland Security officials for investigation, are shown

No arrests have been made, and the investigation into the origin of the drugs is ongoing, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration said. 

Dave Hucker, regional head of international operations for the NCA, said: ‘Taking this amount of cocaine out of circulation will be a massive hit for the organised crime group involved.

‘While this seizure was made on the other side of the Atlantic there is no doubt in my mind that a proportion of these drugs would have ended up on the streets of the UK.

‘We know there are direct links between drug distribution and street violence, intimidation and exploitation in UK towns and cities.

‘These kind of seizures demonstrate the role the NCA plays in preventing that.’

Authorities are shown handling the drugs after they were discovered in the United States, due to be shipped to Britain. They were equivalent to a third of all the UK’s drug seizures last year

U.S. drugs enforcement agent Ray Donovan said: ‘This record-breaking seizure draws attention to this new threat and shows law enforcement’s collaborative efforts in seizing illicit drugs before it gets to the streets and into users’ hands.’   

New York State Police officer Keith Corlett said: ‘The dedication of law enforcement has once again resulted in a massive seizure of deadly drugs. 

‘I applaud our partners for the hard work that kept this dangerous substance from our streets. 

‘Not only did this interception save lives, but it also put an end to the violence often associated with drugs and drug trafficking. 

‘This is a crime we will not tolerate, and one we will continue to fight with our partners in law enforcement.’

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