Duchess Meghan’s lawyer: The term ‘bullying’ gets used very, very casually

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex were quiet during the Duchess of Cambridge’s Keen Birthday Week. Which irritated the crap out of the royal reporters, who were desperate to write “Meghan steals Kate’s birthday thunder” stories. Instead, they were left writing ridiculous stories about water conservation in California and how Meghan and Harry probably aren’t allowed to water their grass? While parts of California are in a drought right now, that’s nothing new and I’ve seen people (on Twitter) say that Montecito isn’t even being affected. Basically, Camilla Tominey was so desperate to say Meghan and Harry’s name on Kate’s birthday, she wrote up a big, stupid and wrong article about their LAWN.

Meanwhile, there was one piece of notable news a few days ago. Remember Amol Rajan’s BBC special, The Princes and the Press? The BBC went ahead with the podcast series about the issues within the special, and Meghan’s lawyer Jenny Afia spoke to Rajan once again:

The Duchess of Sussex’s lawyer has said that the term bullying is used “very, very casually” and can be damaging for “career women”.

Jenny Afia, the head of legal at Schillings – the law firm which represented Meghan Markle in recent court wins against Associated Newspapers Limited (ANL) – said allegations of bullying against the Duchess do not “match my experience of her”. During an episode of the BBC’s Harry, Meghan and the Media podcast, host Amol Rajan asked Afia if the claims of bullying were true.

“No, absolutely not. And I think first thing is to be really clear about what bullying is,” she said. “So the term gets used very, very casually. My daughter called me a bully last week when I asked her to brush her teeth – she’s seven years old. It’s a very very damaging term as we know, particularly I think, for career women. What bullying actually means is improperly using power repeatedly and deliberately to hurt someone, physically or emotionally.”

Afia said the Duchess “absolutely denies” ever bullying anyone, adding: “Knowing her as I do, I can’t believe she would ever do that. I wasn’t there at the time, but it just doesn’t match my experience of her at all and I’ve seen her [at] very, very stressful times. So that story is absolutely untrue that she is a bully – that said, she wouldn’t want to negate anyone’s personal experiences.”

The details of Buckingham Palace’s investigation are yet to be disclosed.

[From The Independent]

Exactly. Afia is wording this carefully, but what she’s saying is dead on. Personally, I don’t have any doubt that certain people FELT “bullied,” in the sense that they felt inadequate, ill-equipped to work with a bright woman, and uncomfortable with Meghan’s American directness. They felt “attacked” by Meghan’s very presence, that much has been clear from the very start. But being uncomfortable with your own incompetence, your own laziness, your own inability to be direct (or deal with someone who is direct) is not the same as “being bullied.” Palace staffers are simply hoping that their vague dog whistles about working women, women of color and Americans will pull them through.

Photos courtesy of Backgrid.

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