Who qualifies for Medicaid?

MEDICAID is a federal and state healthcare program available to millions of Americans – so, are you eligible?

The program provides healthcare coverage to over 72.5 million Americans and is the single largest source of health coverage in the US, according to the Medicaid.gov website.

What is Medicaid?

Medicaid is the nation's public health insurance programme which covers 1 in 5 Americans.

It is one in a long range of care coverage for Americans and covers a broad array of health services and limits.

It makes up a fifth of all healthcare spending, according to KFF, and provides significant funding for hospitals, community health centres, physicians, nursing homes and jobs in the health care sector.

The Centres for Medicare and Medicaid Services, which lies within the Department of Health and Human Services, is responsible for overseeing and implementing Medicaid.

Who qualifies for Medicaid?

The Affordable Care Act created a new way of determining who would be eligible for Medicaid based on their income, known as the Modified Adjusted Gross Income (MAGI) test.

It is the basis for determining eligibility and coverage for most children, pregnant women, parents, and adults.

If your incomes is low enough then you may be eligible for Medicaid.

Anyone with a disability such as blindness or is over the age of 65 are exempt from a MAGI assessment.

To be eligible, individuals must also meet certain non-financial eligibility criteria.

This includes being a resident in the state in which you're receiving Medicaid, being a US citizen, or a qualified non-citizen.

Anyone with household incomes up to 133 per cent of the federal poverty level is eligible to enrol for Medicaid.

Which states is Medicaid available in?

Medicaid is available in all states.

According to KFF, only 39 states have adopted a Medicaid expansion, while 12 have opted out.

In 2012, the Supreme Court ruled that states could not be penalized for opting out of Medicaid expansion.

The twelve states are Texas, Kansas, Wyoming, South Dakota, Wisconsin, Tennessee, North Carolina, South Caroline, Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Florida.

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