Archbishop of Canterbury urges people to have Covid jabs

Archbishop of Canterbury urges people to have Covid jabs because Jesus said Christians should ‘love your neighbour as yourself’

  • Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby has urged the public to get vaccinated
  • ‘Love your neighbour as yourself,’ he quoted from Jesus about need for vaccine
  • He told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme he was not in favour of compulsory jabs
  • In December, the archbishop said on ITV being vaccinated was a ‘moral issue’

The Archbishop of Canterbury has urged people to get vaccinated ‘to look after their neighbours’.

In a BBC Radio 4 interview, Rev Justin Welby said that while he is not in favour of compulsory jabs, he believes in encouraging rather than condemning those who have not yet had the vaccine.

Asked what society’s attitude to the unvaccinated should be, he told the Today programme: ‘I think we need to be encouraging rather than condemnatory, because condemning people doesn’t do much good, apart from anything else, but also it increases the general sense of anger that comes at a time of insecurity and fear and grief.

‘I think we need to be encouraging to people to look after their neighbours.’

He quoted Jesus as saying ‘love your neighbour as yourself’, and added: ‘So, if you do that, it seems to me you go and get vaccinated.

The Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby said that while he is not in favour of compulsory jabs, he believes in encouraging rather than condemning those who have not yet had the vaccine

‘I’d encourage people. I’m not personally in favour of compulsory vaccination by law, but I am very much in favour of encouraging people, of incentivising people to get vaccinated. It makes a difference. It’s not decisive, it’s not the whole story, but it’s an important part of the story.’

It is not the first time the archbishop has spoken out about the importance of Covid vaccines. He told an ITV interviewer in December he agreed that being vaccinated was ‘a moral issue’.   

‘A lot of people won’t like that, but I think it is because it’s not about me and my rights,’ he said.

‘Now obviously there are some people who, for health reasons, can’t be vaccinated – different question – but it’s not about me and my rights to choose. It’s about how I love my neighbour.

‘Vaccination reduces my chances – doesn’t eliminate – but it reduces my chances of getting ill and reducing my chances of getting ill reduces my chances of infecting others. It’s very simple.

‘So I would say yes, to love one another – as Jesus said – get vaccinated, get boosted.’

Rev Justin Welby  quoted Jesus as saying ‘love your neighbour as yourself’, and added: ‘So, if you do that, it seems to me you go and get vaccinated’

Asked if it would be immoral to get refuse getting the jab, Mr Welby added: ‘I understand why people don’t.

‘But I would say, go and get boosted, get vaccinated. It’s how we love our neighbour. Loving our neighbour is what Jesus told us to do. It’s Christmas: do what he said.’

Figures from NHS England show that 3,867 people were in hospital in London with Covid as of Sunday, January 9. This was a reduction from January 5, when patients reached a peak of 4,04 – their highest level since January 2021. 

The archbishop told media before Christmas he was ‘disappointed’ when he saw a leaked photo of government staff having wine and cheese in the Downing Street garden during the first Covid lockdown last year. Boris Johnson insisted that the image showed ‘people at work, talking about work’ in May 2020 – while Covid curbs were in place.

Source: Read Full Article