World News

Brit tourists in tears after seeing distressed elephants, starving ponies and disabled tigers at Majorca zoo – The Sun

BRITISH holidaymakers were left in tears by the site of malnourished and unkempt animals at a Majorca zoo.

Brooklyn Webber, from Suffolk, said she saw emaciated tigers, geese with damaged wings, and ponies with overgrown hooves at the island's Safari Zoo.



She took to Facebook to share a series of upsetting snaps from inside the zoo, pleading with friends to share the post.

“I visited the park today and I have never experienced anything like this before in my life," she wrote.

"I actually cried seeing these animals.

“Many animals in this park are in poor condition, physically and mentally."

"The drive through safari had little/ no shade for the animals to shelter from the sun.

"Also, no grazing areas as the ground solely consisted of rocks and earth.

"Also there is little drinking opportunities for these animals and the little water that was there was filthy.

The zoo, which sits just outside the city of Sa Coma on Majorca's eastern cost, costs £17 to enter.

Ms Webber went on to describe the effects of the conditions on different animals.

"Inside the zoo – The tigers were malnourished; pure skin and bones! One of [them] was in pain, struggling to walk!

"The big cat enclosures are far too small for the size and number of the animals in there.

"Nor were these animals stimulated in anyway at all.

“The elephants are the same; clearly not stimulated and distressed due to the swaying motion, head bobbing and lifting the front foot, that they do.

“The hair on the monkeys back is bald.

“Two geese in the enclosure had damaged wings.

"And a further cage inside of this cage was cramped full of pigeons. Why is this?

“None of the enclosures had clean drinking water which is despicable in these hot conditions.

“The Shetland ponies are skin and bones with feet months over grown!!"

'SHOULD BE CLOSED'

The zoo's website says it as a successful mixture of a wildlife and leisure park, and that its land "gives more than 600 animals a home".

It says it aims to give visitors the opportunity to experience wild animals as if they were on safari.

But Ms Webber said: “This so-called attraction should be closed down and these people should be held accountable for the suffering of these animals.

"Not one person in the park seems to care about these animals. Absolutely disgraceful.

“No wonder animals are becoming extinct in the world when places like this are continuing to stay open.

“I wish I had taken more photos as proof of the neglect that is taking place here but I couldn’t bring myself to look at them suffering anymore.”

Other tourists to have visited the zoo have left similar reviews on TripAdvisor going back a number of years.

One wrote: “Do not go there, I was in tears seeing these poor animals.

"This place needs to be shut down immediately.

"An absolute abusive and horrible situation for these animals.

"Boycott this joke of a ZOO.”

Another traveller from London said: “I really wish we hadn’t of gone to this zoo, the poor animals are kept in such awful conditions that it’s just cruel.

“How anyone could go there and think it is a good trip must think animal cruelty is acceptable.

"The place is so run down with no upkeep whatsoever, it actually looks derelict in some parts."

Zoo director Henning Mentz told Sun Online: “The photos and comments shared on Facebook and TripAdvisor do not accurately represent conditions at the park.

“Animals at Safari Zoo are well cared for and have all the food, water, and shade they require.

“One of the photos on Facebook claims to show a monkey losing its hair.

“In fact, the monkey had recently undergone surgery that required a section on the monkey’s back to be shaved.

“The zoo has a vet on-site at all times to tend to the animals should they suffer injury or become sick.

“Ninety-nine per cent of visitors to the zoo enjoy their visitor and are happy with conditions here.”

He also claimed that one of the photos of a lion shared by Ms Webber dates from 2010.







Source: Read Full Article