Coin worn by Julius Caesar's killer to be auctioned for £1m

Rare coin ‘worn by Julius Caesar’s killer’ and minted to celebrate the Roman leader’s assassination could fetch up to £1.5m at auction

  • Julius Caesar was murdered in Rome on March 15, 44BC by Brutus and Cassius
  • The rare gold Eid Mar (Ides of March) coin could sell for £1.5m in a Zurich auction
  • One expert said it commemorates one of the most important moments in history

Minted to celebrate the assassination of Julius Caesar, this Roman coin may even have been worn around the neck of one of his murderers.

Now the rare gold Eid Mar (Ides of March) coin is being sold and could fetch £1.5million at auction.

It is one of only three known to exist and unique in having a hole in it so it could be worn as a pendant.

Julius Caesar was killed by Roman senators led by Brutus and Cassius on March 15, 44BC

The rare gold Eid Mar (Ides of March) coin is being sold and could fetch £1.5million at auction

The coin, celebrating Caesar’s assassination were struck two years after the event, documented here in Carry On form

It has been on display at the British Museum for the last decade, on long-term loan from a private collector who has now decided to sell it.

Caesar was killed by Roman senators led by Brutus and Cassius on the Ides of March – March 15 – in 44BC.

The coin, due to be sold in Zurich, Switzerland, on Monday, shows a portrait of Brutus on the head. The reverse has two daggers representing Brutus and co-conspirator Cassius, plus a pileus – a felt cap worn by freed slaves, alluding to Rome’s freedom from the ‘tyranny of Caesar’.

The Eid Mar coins were struck in 42BC by a military mint travelling with Brutus and Cassius’s forces. This rare gold version – more were made in silver – was likely to have been worn by a high-ranking supporter and, it has been speculated, one of Caesar’s murderers.

Arturo Russo, of specialist ancient coin firm Numismatica Ars Classica, which is selling this one, said it commemorated ‘one of the most important moments in Western history’.

This rare gold version – more were made in silver – was likely to have been worn by a high-ranking supporter and, it has been speculated, one of Caesar’s murderers

Arturo Russo, of specialist ancient coin firm Numismatica Ars Classica, which is selling this one, said it commemorated ‘one of the most important moments in Western history’

The coin, due to be sold in Zurich, Switzerland, on Monday, shows a portrait of Brutus on the head. The reverse has two daggers representing Brutus and co-conspirator Cassius, plus a pileus – a felt cap worn by freed slaves, alluding to Rome’s freedom from the ‘tyranny of Caesar’

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