Great white shark lunges at bait in close-up photos captured in Mexico

That’s Jaws-ome! Great white shark appears to grin at the camera and then lunges at bait in stunning close-up photos captured in Mexico

  • Snaps show a mighty Great White Shark taking a bite out of its next meal
  • Its jaws open wide ready to devour its prey as the enormous predator closes in 
  • The photos were taken in Mexico about 130 miles off the coast of Baja California 

A mighty Great White Shark prepares to take a bite out of its next meal in Guadeloupe, Mexico.

Its jaws open wide ready to devour its prey as the enormous predator closes in on its target.

One image shows a shark eyeing the photographer snapping from his cage whilst surrounded by a flurry of black and white stripy fish.

Great white sharks gained notoriety in the 1975 film ‘Jaws’ and are feared by many who go in the ocean.

A mighty Great White Shark taking a bite out of his next meal in Guadeloupe, Mexico

One image shows the shark appearing to pose for the camera whilst surrounded by a flurry of black and white stripy fish

The photographer said he wasn’t scared by the shark: ‘The sharks are curious but not aggressive towards us in the slightest’

Great white sharks can grow to around 20 feet in length and weigh up to 6,600 pounds, heavier than a car.

Euan Rannachan took the photos about 130 miles off the coast of Baja California. 

‘A large male white shark had been interested in the bait and made a couple of half-hearted attempts to catch it,’ he said.

‘When those failed it went full apex predator on the line right in front of me.’

The photographer said he wasn’t shaken by the experience.  

‘Never once have I felt scared in the cage,’ he said.

‘Once you are in the water with these animals it’s easy to show just how peaceful it is and not scary at all.

‘The sharks are curious but not aggressive towards us in the slightest.’

Sharks use their noses as a means of detecting prey in the water, feeling electrical signals in the water, even allowing it to ‘hear’ a heartbeat.

‘White sharks have little jelly-filled sacks predominantly in their noses called Ampullae de Lorenzini,’ he said.

‘They use these little holes filled with jelly to feel electrical impulses in the water such as an animal in distress.

‘They also can use these sensors to feel your heartbeat in the cage.’

Great white sharks can grow to around 20 feet in length and weigh up to 6,600 pounds, heavier than a car

Sharks use their noses as a means of detecting prey in the water, feeling electrical signals in the water, even allowing it to ‘hear’ a heartbeat

A shark’s dorsal fin is seen above the water, a clear signal to swimmers of an approaching predator in the water

‘Once you are in the water with these animals it’s easy to show just how peaceful it is and not scary at all

Great white sharks: Feared predators of the deep

Great white sharks have such a strong sense of smell that they can detect a colony of seals two miles away

Great whites give birth to up to ten ‘pups’ but mothers will eat them if they don’t swim off fast enough

They swim at up to 37mph at full pelt and burst out of the water from below their prey

They attack 5-10 humans every year but usually just take a ‘sample bite’ out of curiosity before swimming off

Great whites can live to up to 70 years old

They are colored white underneath to make them harder to see from below with sunlight shining down

They have several rows of teeth that can number into the thousands

As their teeth fall out they are replaced by razor sharp teeth in the row behind

Male great white sharks generally arrive at the same time to the Farallon Islands off the California Coast and the offshore Island of Guadalupe, Mexico from late July through August, and females arrive to these locations several weeks thereafter.

The sharks are observed at their coastal aggregation sites through February.

Great white sharks are opportunists, feeding from the ocean’s surface to the seafloor

Smaller great whites prey on fish, rays, and crustaceans, but larger ones also eat seals, sea lions, dolphins, seabirds, marine turtles, rays, and other sharks

 

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